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Bedroom in Arles

A bedroom, with a bed and two chairs dressing table mirror and a towel draped on the wall with frames pictures on the wall.

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Café Terrace at Night

A scene of a cafe ar night time with people in the background

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Cypresses

Swirly clouds cypress trees and a mountain in the distance

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Oleanders

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Portrait d'Eugene Boch

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Self-portrait with Straw Hat

A Post-Impressionistic self portrait of Vincent himself

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Shoes

A pair of laced shoes

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Starry Night

Van Gogh created Starry Night in 1889 just thirteen months before his death when he was staying in an asylum at Saint-Remy. Starry Night is believed to show the view from his bedroom window.

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Starry Night Over the Rhone

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Sunflowers

Vincents most well known pice

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The Flowering Orchard

Spring trees in an orchard with flowers blooming

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The Potato Eaters

A family sitting around a table eating a dinner of potatoes

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Vincent van Gogh

A self Portraite

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The Church at Auvers

While he stays at the Ravoux family café in the Place de la Mairie and makes several studies of Dr. Gachet`s garden and produces his masterpiece the Church at Auvers.

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Terrace and Observation Deck at the Moulin De Blute-Fin, Montmartre, 1886

Terrace and Observation deck at the Moulin de Blute-Fin, Montmartre, 1886

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Corridor in the asylum

A Painting of the corridor in the

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Head of an Angel, after Rembrandt

“The Angel (After Rembrandt)” is also known as “Head of an Angel (After Rembrandt)” and “Half Figure of an Angel (After Rembrandt).” It’s an oil painting that looks more like watercolors than oils completed in September 1899, less than a year before Vincent Van Gogh would die of a gunshot wound.

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Vase with Five Sunflowers

Van Gogh envisioned his sunflower works as a series and worked diligently on them in anticipation of the arrival in Arles of his friend, Paul Gauguin. In a letter to Emile Bernard written around 18 August 1888 Vincent wrote: "I am thinking of decorating my studio with half a dozen pictures of "Sunflowers", a decoration in which the raw or broken chrome yellows will blaze forth on various backgrounds--blue, from the palest malachite green to royal blue . . ."

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Three Sunflowers in a Vase

Vincent eventually planned a dozen sunflower works to be hung in the Yellow House which he and Gauguin would use for a studio. "I’d like to do a decoration for the studio. Nothing but large Sunflowers. Next door to your shop, in the restaurant, as you know, there’s such a beautiful decoration of flowers there; I still remember the big sunflower in the window. Well, if I carry out this plan there’ll be a dozen or so panels. The whole thing will therefore be a symphony in blue and yellow. I work on it all these mornings, from sunrise. Because the flowers wilt quickly and it’s a matter of doing the whole thing in one go.

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The Vestibule of the Asylum

The Vistibule of the Asylum

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Self Portrait

Self portrait of Vincent

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Irises

Van Gogh painted this still life in the psychiatric hospital at Saint-Rémy. He viewed Irises primarily as a colour study, and he painted the luxuriant bouquet twice. He set out in this version to achieve a powerful colour contrast, while in the other still life he pursued the opposite – a soft, pastel effect. The flowers are placed against a uniformly yellow background, making them stand out even more strongly. The irises were originally purple, but the red pigment has since faded, turning them blue.

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A Pair of Shoes

A Pair of Shoes

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Portrait of Pere Tanguy 1887-8

Julien-François Tanguy, or Pere (father) Tanguy, as he was affectionately called by van Gogh and his artist friends, was a well known figure in the Parisian Art circles of the late 1800’s. Owner of an art supply shop on the Rue Clauzel, Pere Tanguy often accepted paintings as payment for art supplies.

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